30/07/2014


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A United Nations soldier stands at the crash site of Air Algerie Flight 5017 on Saturday, July 26. A U.N. spokeswoman says a second flight data from the DC-83 was recovered on Saturday. The flight, carrying 116 people when it took off from Burkina Faso on July 24 bound for Algiers, crashed in Mali's Gossi region, west of Gao. Regrettably, there were no survivors, said French President Francois Hollande.A United Nations soldier stands at the crash site of Air Algerie Flight 5017 on Saturday, July 26. A U.N. spokeswoman says a second flight data from the DC-83 was recovered on Saturday. The flight, carrying 116 people when it took off from Burkina Faso on July 24 bound for Algiers, crashed in Mali’s Gossi region, west of Gao. “Regrettably, there were no survivors,” said French President Francois Hollande.

 A team from the U.N. mission to Mali, known as MINUSMA, is assisting the Malian authorities at the request of that country's government, spokeswoman Radhia Achouri said. A team from the U.N. mission to Mali, known as MINUSMA, is assisting the Malian authorities at the request of that country’s government, spokeswoman Radhia Achouri said.

A French soldier looks at the debris from the crash on July 26. A French soldier looks at the debris from the crash on July 26.

Wreckage of Air Algerie Flight 5017 was secured by French forces in northern Mali, not far from the border with Burkina Faso, according to French President Francois Hollande. Wreckage of Air Algerie Flight 5017 was secured by French forces in northern Mali, not far from the border with Burkina Faso, according to French President Francois Hollande.

The wreckage was found in a disintegrated state, Hollande said. The first black box flight recorder was found on July 25.The wreckage was found in a “disintegrated state,” Hollande said. The first “black box” flight recorder was found on July 25.

The jet, an MD-83, disappeared from radar less than an hour into its flight. Officials said it changed its flight path because of bad weather. The jet, an MD-83, disappeared from radar less than an hour into its flight. Officials said it changed its flight path because of bad weather.

The plane's wreckage was found in Mali's Gossi region, not far from the border with Burkina Faso. It was bound for the Algerian capital of Algiers.The plane’s wreckage was found in Mali’s Gossi region, not far from the border with Burkina Faso. It was bound for the Algerian capital of Algiers.

As for the cause of the crash, officials say they are not ruling anything out. It is still too early to draw any conclusions, Hollande said.As for the cause of the crash, officials say they are not ruling anything out. “It is still too early to draw any conclusions,” Hollande said.


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(CNN) — France has declared a three-day mourning period to commemorate the victims of the Air Algerie Flight 5017 crash, French President Francois Hollande declared on Saturday.

Following a meeting with families of the victims, Hollande said flags will fly at half-staff on government buildings from Monday through Wednesday.

Fifty-four of the 118 victims were French nationals.

The second flight data recorder from has been found in Mali, a U.N. official said Saturday.


Reuters: Plane wreckage found in Mali


Air Algerie flight’s tragic timeline


New video of Air Algerie crash site

A team from the U.N. mission to Mali, known as MINUSMA, is assisting the Malian authorities, at the request of that country’s government, spokeswoman Radhia Achouri said.

There were no survivors on the flight, which took off Thursday from Burkina Faso bound for Algeria.

Accounts of the number of people on board continue to differ. Air Algerie says 117 passengers and six crew were on the plane, but France says there were 118 victims in total. The Algerian government said there were 116 passengers and six crew.

The wreckage was found in what Hollande said was a “disintegrated state” in Mali’s Gossi region, not far from the border with Burkina Faso.

The first data recorder, or black box, was found at the crash site on Friday. The cause of the crash is not yet confirmed, but weather may have been a factor.

Less than an hour into the flight, the aircraft, an MD-83, disappeared from radar after changing its flight path because of bad weather, officials said.

The U.N. mission’s support includes logistics, transportation, technical and scientific expertise, as well as help securing the crash site, which is in a remote and inaccessible location.

“Our experts assists the Malians and the French in the search of the site, collecting bodies, providing body bags and in securing the site aiming to speed up the work,” said Achouri.

As part of French efforts to assist, 33 French forensic experts arrived at the crash site Saturday.

How flight attendants keep flying after air disasters

World unrest raises travel tension

Opinion: Despite plane crashes, it’s safe to fly


Article source: http://rss.cnn.com/~r/rss/edition_world/~3/UnqSijK419E/index.html


Students who had been on board the ferry arrived at the Ansan, South Korea, courthouse under a heavy police presence Monday.

Ansan, South Korea (CNN) — Students aboard the stricken Sewol ferry had to use rising water levels to float out of their cabins after the ship listed, survivors told a South Korean court Monday.

At least 294 people died — including hundreds of high school students on a field trip — when the Sewol capsized off South Korea’s southwestern coast April 16.

The ship had been carrying 476 passengers and crew, and divers are still searching for 10 people.

The ferry’s captain, Lee Joon-seok, is on trial, accused of murder, along with three of his crew. They deny the charges.

Twelve other members of the crew have been indicted on charges of abandonment and violating a ship safety act.


Angry families speak out at ferry trial


Trial under way for ferry captain, crew

It has been alleged that the crew did not use available resources, such as life rafts, life vests and announcements, to evacuate passengers. Instead, passengers were told to stay where they were, according to officials.

Six student survivors testified Monday at a court in their hometown of Ansan. Their identities cannot be published.

The second student to testify said she heard an announcement asking those on board to put on life jackets and remain on the ferry.

The student told the court that she did not hear any announcement from the ship or coast guards telling passengers to leave the ship.

She said the ferry listed to the extent that the windows were on the ground and the door was on the ceiling in her cabin.

As water came in, their class leader suggested that because they were in life jackets they could float to the door. They eventually were able to escape, walking on the hallway.

The fifth student said that she considered trying to escape once the ferry began listing, but did not because she heard the announcement asking passengers to stay put.

She said the lights then went out and she saw that the window was completely covered in water. She escaped when the water rose and she was able to float to the door. Students already in the hallway dragged her outside.

Another student described the scene in the hallway as she lined up to exit. She said a strong current was in the water and about half the students with her were swept away.

The student said she could see coast guards near the emergency exit, but she never saw them enter the ship.

After the students’ testimony, the court heard from another survivor, who was in a wheelchair and wearing a hospital gown.

He described how he had managed to get himself near the information desk when the ferry had started to tilt.

The man said the students had been panicking and a female crew member announced that “everyone should stay put, the ferry is in danger, and that the rescue will be there soon.” He said he thought she was trying to calm the students.

The man said that he had asked the crew member to contact the captain, but that the captain had not responded when she tried to reach him on a walkie-talkie

The female crew member announced again that everyone should stay put and that help would arrive soon, he said, and later told students to put on their life jackets

The man broke down crying as he described watching people slide as the boat tilted about 40 or 50 degrees.

Tense trial opening in June

The students arrived at the Ansan courthouse under a heavy police presence Monday, with lines of officers surrounding the building.

At the trial’s opening June 10 in Gwangju, victims’ relatives yelled and screamed at those on trial upon seeing them for the first time.

Investigators have said a vast amount of cargo — more than double the ferry’s limit — and the failure to tie it down properly were partly responsible for the Sewol’s capsizing.

At the trial’s opening, the prosecution accused the ferry’s owner, Chonghaejin Shipping Co., of putting profit above all else by overloading the Sewol.

It said the cargo was badly secured, meaning the crew was also culpable.

Prosecutors said the crew members could have carried out a far more effective rescue operation.

In June, Lee’s attorney told the court that the captain had been helming the ship for only six days, he was the last rescued of all the crew members and he wasn’t in charge of loading cargo.

If convicted of murder, Lee and his fellow accused could face the death penalty, although it has been nearly two decades since capital punishment was carried out in South Korea.

Read: Angry families scream at South Korean ferry captain

Read: Ferry fugitive’s cause of death unknown

Read: Sewol ferry search helicopter crash kills 5 in South Korea

Report: Ferry operators prioritized profits over safety

CNN’s K.J. Kwon and Susannah Cullinane contributed to this report.


Article source: http://rss.cnn.com/~r/rss/edition_world/~3/qjN3yi62-Qw/index.html

(CNN) — A 16-year-old Japanese girl has been arrested in Sasebo, Nagasaki prefecture, on suspicion of murdering a fellow student. Police confirmed that the alleged attacker also dismembered her victim’s body.

The girl, who cannot be named as she is a minor, is suspected of hitting Aiwa Matsuo, 15, with an object repeatedly before strangling her.

The victim’s family said that she had gone to meet friends Saturday afternoon and alerted police when she did not return later that evening.

The teen admitted killing Matsuo, and told police she acted alone. The teen, who turned 16 the day of her arrest, admitted to dismembering the body, including decapitation and severing her left hand.

The English-language Japan Times reported that the alleged attacker’s “friends and acquaintances” described her as “very smart, with emotional ups and downs.”

It has been reported that her father remarried after the suspect’s mother died last year and lives elsewhere in the southwestern Japanese city.

At a press conference, the principal of the school that both attacker and victim attended said that the institution was not aware of any trouble between the two.

“I have no words to say now. I am overwhelmed by sadness, regret and various feelings,” he said.

Reports indicate that the body was discovered early Sunday morning on a bed at the girl’s apartment, where she lives alone. Implements used in the attack were found on, and next to, the bed.

Despite Japan’s deserved reputation for safety and a relative lack of violent crime in the country, it is not the first time that Sasebo has appeared in headlines featuring violence perpetrated by minors — in 2004, an elementary school-aged girl in the city killed a classmate, slashing her throat.

Connecticut teen accused in slashing death of classmate charged as adult

12-year-old girl stabbed 19 times; friends arrested


Article source: http://rss.cnn.com/~r/rss/edition_world/~3/mc_diiJ5vLE/index.html

Donetsk, Ukraine (CNN) — It is, in the words of one frustrated official, “one of the biggest open crime scenes in the world.”

And yet, 11 days after Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 was blown out of the sky by a suspected surface-to-air missile, the Dutch investigators in charge of finding out what happened have yet to lay eyes on the wreckage or the human remains believed to remain strewn across the enormous debris field.

The latest setback came Monday, when a 45-person team of Dutch and Australian experts, accompanied by monitors from the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe, abandoned their effort to reach the site after hearing explosions and being warned of heavy fighting in the area.

It’s the same thing that happened Sunday.

“We’re really sick and tired of being delayed,” Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe spokesman Michael Bociurkiw told CNN’s “New Day.”

A birthday card found in a sunflower field near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 in eastern Ukraine, on Thursday, July 24. The passenger plane was shot down July 17 above Ukraine. All 298 people aboard were killed, and much of what they left behind was scattered in a vast field of debris.A birthday card found in a sunflower field near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 in eastern Ukraine, on Thursday, July 24. The passenger plane was shot down July 17 above Ukraine. All 298 people aboard were killed, and much of what they left behind was scattered in a vast field of debris.

A classical music record is seen among the sunflowers on July 24. A classical music record is seen among the sunflowers on July 24.

A shoe, appearing to be brand new, sits under foliage at the crash site. A shoe, appearing to be brand new, sits under foliage at the crash site.

Two Dutch passports belonging to passengers lie in a field at the site of the crash on Tuesday, July 22.Two Dutch passports belonging to passengers lie in a field at the site of the crash on Tuesday, July 22.

Clothing, sunglasses and chocolate are seen on July 22.Clothing, sunglasses and chocolate are seen on July 22.

More sunglasses and a travel guide lie in the field on July 22.More sunglasses and a travel guide lie in the field on July 22.

A doll is seen on the ground on Saturday, July 19.A doll is seen on the ground on Saturday, July 19.

A single shoe is seen among the debris and wreckage on July 19. There has been concern that the site has not been sealed off properly and that vital evidence is being tampered with. A single shoe is seen among the debris and wreckage on July 19. There has been concern that the site has not been sealed off properly and that vital evidence is being tampered with.

Pieces of a wristwatch lie on a plastic cover at the crash site. Pieces of a wristwatch lie on a plastic cover at the crash site.

A toy monkey.A toy monkey.

Books, bags, a tourist T-shirt. Ukraine's government said it had received reports of looting, and it urged relatives to cancel the victims' credit cards. But a CNN crew at the scene July 19 said it did not see any signs of looting.Books, bags, a tourist T-shirt. Ukraine’s government said it had received reports of looting, and it urged relatives to cancel the victims’ credit cards. But a CNN crew at the scene July 19 said it did not see any signs of looting.

Passports were scattered across the large field.Passports were scattered across the large field.

Playing cards and euros are seen at the crash site.Playing cards and euros are seen at the crash site.

A travel guide and toiletries.A travel guide and toiletries.

Luggage on Friday, July 18.Luggage on Friday, July 18.

An empty suitcase is cordoned off near the plane's impact site on Thursday, July 17.An empty suitcase is cordoned off near the plane’s impact site on Thursday, July 17.


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MH17: What they left behindMH17: What they left behind


Ukrainian civilians caught in crossfire


Fighting turns back MH17 investigators


Ukraine residents flee fighting

“We all know there are still human remains out there exposed to the elements, number one,” he said. “Secondly, it is one of the biggest open crime scenes in the world as we speak, and it is not secured. There’s no security perimeter around the 30- or 35-square-kilometer site.”

According to unconfirmed reports from pro-Russian rebels, Ukraine’s military broke through to part of the crash site Monday and had stationed armored personnel carriers and dug trenches there.

“Safe work of experts and observers is impossible,” Vladimir Antyufeev, the acting Prime Minister for the self-proclaimed Donetsk People’s Republic, said Monday.

The United Nations and other countries have repeatedly called for a cease-fire to allow investigators a safe working environment at the crash site, which the U.N. human rights chief said Monday could be the scene of a war crime.

The Malaysian government had struck a deal with rebels to allow unarmed international police officers to guard the site, but the fighting has made that impossible.

“This is a contested zone. There is active fighting going on,” Andrew Colvin, deputy commissioner of the Australian Federal Police, said at a news conference Monday in Canberra.

“We are working on the basis that if it’s a permissive environment, we will go in,” he said.

Bociurkiw said Monday that investigators will try to reach the site again Tuesday.

“We will keep trying every day,” he said.

A CNN crew joined the convoy that attempted to go to the crash site Monday, but the media were stopped by armed men near Shakhtorsk. The forensic teams turned around not long later.

Other people were also fleeing the violence.

One man said jets were flying over his home.

“My little one is terrified,” the man said.

Identifying the bodies

As of Monday, 227 coffins bearing remains from the crashed plane had been sent to the Netherlands, where forensic investigators were working to identify them.

Of the 298 people killed in the crash, 193 were Dutch, 43 were Malaysian, and 27 were Australian.

More than 200 forensics experts from all over the world are working at a Dutch military base to identify the remains, according to Howard Day, who is leading the effort.

Investigators aren’t sure how many sets of remains they have. Only one victim — a Dutch man — has been identified.

“This will take weeks; it will take months,” Day said.

Experts are using a variety of approaches in their work, including dental records, DNA analysis and fingerprints, he said.

“We don’t just identify people from a photograph or from an item of property that may be on them, because there’s been countless mistakes, examples of mistakes where that’s happened in the past over the years, even small incidents, like car crashes,” he said.

Russian role in conflict debated


Challenge of identifying MH17 victims


U.S.: Russia boosting forces in Ukraine


Family’s one last photo aboard MH17


U.S.: Russia ‘absolutely’ culpable for MH17

The fighting appeared to be moving southeast from Horlivka, a city about 30 miles (about 50 kilometers) northwest of the crash site. At least 13 people, including two children, were killed in fighting Sunday in and near Horlivka, the Donetsk Regional Authority said.

At least 332 Ukrainian soldiers have been killed and nearly 1,300 have been injured since April 7, according to Ukraine’s National Defense and Security Council and law enforcement agencies. There is no known figure for the number of rebels killed.

Meanwhile, debate continued over Russia’s role in the conflict.

On Sunday, the State Department released satellite images that it said showed Russians firing into Ukraine.

“We are putting out evidence to confirm the points that not only has Russia been providing the weapons across the border, including heavy weapons, but they have also now been firing artillery barrages across the border,” senior White House adviser Ben Rhodes said.

Russian officials have denied arming the rebels. At a news conference Monday, Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov said he hoped that deployment of an Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe observer mission at two checkpoints on the Russian-Ukrainian border would clarify what was happening on the ground.

Russia wants ‘impartial’ MH17 investigation

U.S. and Ukrainian officials have said that a Russian-made missile system was used to shoot down Flight 17 from rebel territory. Russia and the rebels have disputed the allegations and blamed Ukraine for the crash.

On Monday, U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights Navi Pillay said that what happened “may amount to a war crime.”

“It is imperative that a prompt, thorough, effective, independent and impartial investigation be conducted into this event,” Pillay said.

Russia announced over the weekend that it had formed a team to join the investigation, state-run news agency RIA Novosti reported. It will be led by the deputy head of the Federal Air Transport Agency, Oleg Storchevoy.

Lavrov called for an “impartial” investigation carried out with agreement from the U.N. Security Council. But State Department spokeswoman Jen Psaki said Monday on CNN that the United States has little faith in what Russia says.

“The Russians have mastered the art of saying one thing and doing another,” she said.

Russian foreign minister shrugs off sanctions

The United States will place new sanctions on Russia this week, White House Deputy National Security Adviser Tony Blinken announced Monday without elaborating.

Representatives from EU member states will meet Tuesday to consider the proposals, according to the EU website.

The new proposals include sanctions on weapons, goods that can be used for both civilian and military purposes, access to European capital markets and on the export of energy technology from Europe to Russia.

Psaki said Monday that what happens next is up to Russia.

“We’re seeing a serious impact of just the sanctions we have put in place to date,” she said.

“The Europeans want to do more. We expect they’ll do more,” Psaki said. “So the question for the Russians is, do they care about the economy and how it’s impacting their people, or are they just going to be in denial about what impact these sanctions are having?”

Lavrov said Monday that the Russian government wasn’t happy about all the sanctions but that the country would overcome any economic difficulties and become more independent as a result.

“We are only seeing the desire of our Western partners to punish Russia,” he said.

Also Monday, the United States accused Russia of violating the 1987 Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty, citing cruise missile tests that date to 2008, senior State Department and White House officials said.

“This is a very serious matter which we have attempted to address with Russia for some time now,” said a senior State Department official.

Russia’s suspected violation of the treaty was first reported Monday by The New York Times.

“The 2014 Compliance Report of the treaty includes a determination that the Russian Federation is in violation of its INF Treaty obligations not to possess, produce, or flight-test a ground-launched cruise missile with a range capability of 500 to 5,500 kilometers (310 to 3,417 miles), or to possess or produce launchers of such missiles,” a White House official said, adding that they “have kept the Congress and our allies informed of this matter.”

The violation was for cruise missile tests that date back to 2008, prompting an administration review as to whether the tests are in violation of the 1987 treaty between the United States and Russia banning medium range missiles.

Officials told CNN that Washington had called for senior-level talks, but insisted the situation was not related to the violence in Ukraine.

What you need to know about Russia and sanctions

Malaysian PM’s ‘quiet diplomacy’

Who are Ukraine’s pro-Russia rebels

CNN’s Nick Paton Walsh reported from Donetsk; Kyung Lah reported from Kiev, Ukraine; and Jethro Mullen reported and wrote from Hong Kong. CNN’s Elise Labott, Michelle Kosinski, Ivan Watson, Susannah Palk, Mick Krever, Ashley Fantz, Ray Sanchez, Radina Gigova, Deborah Bloom and Victoria Butenko contributed to this report.


Article source: http://rss.cnn.com/~r/rss/edition_world/~3/JqFdwzmB6nQ/index.html

World’s most beautiful piers

Posted by MereNews On July - 29 - 2014 ADD COMMENTS


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The distinctive whale bone structure of Umhlanga Pier won the South African National Award for Outstanding Civil Engineering Achievement.The distinctive whale bone structure of Umhlanga Pier won the South African National Award for Outstanding Civil Engineering Achievement.

Italy's Rotonda a Mare was built in 1923 but closed in 2005 for renovations. It reopened a year later, with a beautiful sea-themed mosaic by Enzo Cucchi adorning the entrance.Italy’s Rotonda a Mare was built in 1923 but closed in 2005 for renovations. It reopened a year later, with a beautiful sea-themed mosaic by Enzo Cucchi adorning the entrance.

Late English poet Sir John Betjeman described Clevedon Pier as the most beautiful pier in England.Late English poet Sir John Betjeman described Clevedon Pier as “the most beautiful pier in England.”

Kastrup Pier in Denmark has a structure at the end that encircles an outdoor swimming area.Kastrup Pier in Denmark has a structure at the end that encircles an outdoor swimming area.

With a length of 560 meters, the beautiful Huntington Beach Pier in California is one of the longest on the U.S. west coast. With a length of 560 meters, the beautiful Huntington Beach Pier in California is one of the longest on the U.S. west coast.

Mexico's Los Muertos Pier is especially popular with couples -- Los Muertos is one of Puerto Vallarta's most romantic areas.Mexico’s Los Muertos Pier is especially popular with couples — Los Muertos is one of Puerto Vallarta’s most romantic areas.

Scheveningen Pier in The Netherlands stands out because of its unusual construction, which comprises four island-type sections and upper and lower areas.Scheveningen Pier in The Netherlands stands out because of its unusual construction, which comprises four island-type sections and upper and lower areas.

Brighton's only remaining pier (the rest have burned down) is one of the most popular along the UK's southern coast.Brighton’s only remaining pier (the rest have burned down) is one of the most popular along the UK’s southern coast.

Australia's Busselton Jetty is 1,841 meters long -- the longest in the Southern Hemisphere.Australia’s Busselton Jetty is 1,841 meters long — the longest in the Southern Hemisphere.


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(CNN) — It’s a good summer for piers.

Ryde Pier in the UK just celebrated its 200th birthday, and New York’s historic Pier A will reopen any time now (we’re told), after decades of neglect and a multi-million dollar revamp.

The structure, first opened in 1886 and now listed on the National Register of Historic Places, closed to the public in 1960 but will soon host a visitor center, an oyster bar and a fine dining restaurant.

If you can’t get to these icons of jetty-hood though, there are plenty of other spectacular piers to travel for.

Umhlanga Pier (Durban, South Africa)

This pier isn’t just a place to grab a great photo — it’s an extension of an underground culvert that helps disperse excess storm water from the land into the ocean.

The distinctive whale bone structure won the South African National Award for Outstanding Civil Engineering Achievement.

Length: 80 meters.

Opened: 2007.

Contains: Storm water disposal channels.

Cost: Free.

MORE: 10 of the world’s most underrated cities

A beautiful sea-themed mosaic adorns the entrance.

Rotonda a Mare (Senigallia, Italy)

Rotonda a Mare (“circular pier”) had additional purposes during wartime, serving as a military warehouse during World War II.

The pier was built in 1923 but closed in 2005 for renovations. It reopened a year later, with a beautiful sea-themed mosaic by Enzo Cucchi adorning the entrance.

Opened: 1923.

Contains: A concert hall.

Cost: Free.

MORE: Italy’s best beaches and islands

Clevedon Pier (Somerset, UK)

Late English poet Sir John Betjeman described this pier as “the most beautiful pier in England.”

It was built in 1869 as a departure point for paddle steamer excursions, and is the only fully intact, Grade 1 listed pier in the UK.

The supports were constructed using metal taken from Isambard Kingdom Brunel’s South Wales railway.

Length: 312 meters.

Opened: 1869.

Contains: Art gallery and gift shop.

Cost: $1.60 for children, $3 for adults.

MORE: Survival guide to the UK

Kastrup Pier (Kastrup, Denmark)

This unusual pier contains a structure that encircles an outdoor swimming area, allowing visitors to take a dip without the risk of being washed out to sea.

The pier is made from azobe wood, which is resistant to sea water and at night up-lighting emphasizes the beautiful curved wooden walls and illuminates the swimming area — and the skinny dippers who reportedly frequent it.

Length: 100 meters.

Opened: 2004.

Contains: A swimming area and diving platform.

Cost: Free.

MORE: No chance at Noma? 6 of Copenhagen’s other great restaurants

Great place for a sundowner.

Huntington Beach Pier (California)

With a length of 560 meters, this beautiful Californian pier is one of the longest on the U.S. west coast.

During World War II it doubled as a submarine lookout post, with machine guns positioned at the end.

If you don’t live nearby, you can check out the view from the pier at any Hollister store — footage recorded by cameras at the end are shown on screens inside.

Length: 560 meters.

Opened: 1914.

Contains: A diner and shops.

Cost: Free.

MORE: 18 wacky hotels in the United States

Los Muertos Pier (Puerto Vallarta, Mexico)

This 328-meter-long pier was designed by architect José de Jesús Torres Vega and opened in 2013 as part of a scheme to regenerate Puerto Vallarta.

Construction costs totaled $2.4 million.

The pier is especially popular with couples; historically, Los Muertos is one of Puerto Vallarta’s most romantic areas, despite the name’s distinctly unromantic translation: Los Muertos means “the dead.”

Length: 328 meters.

Opened: 2013.

Contains: A landing dock and sculpture.

Cost: Free.

MORE: 10 things Mexico does better than anywhere else

Scheveningen Pier (Scheveningen, Holland)

Scheveningen pier stands out because of its unusual construction, which comprises four island-type sections and upper and lower areas.

The structure, the longest pier in the Netherlands, was built in 1959 and purchased by hotel firm Van der Valk Hotels for the symbolic price of one guilder ($0.50) in 2001.

Length: 382 meters.

Opened: 1959.

Contains: Restaurant, casino and a children’s funhouse.

Cost: Free.

MORE: Amsterdam for tourists: What’s legal?

Brighton's only remaining pier (the rest have burned down).

Brighton Pier (Brighton, UK)

Brighton’s only remaining pier (the rest have burned down) has had starring roles in “Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street,” the 1970s British TV series “The Persuaders” and Ralph Fiennes’ drama “The End of the Affair.”

An unusual fact? If Usain Bolt maintained his 200 meter sprint record for its entire length, it would take him 50.36 seconds to reach the end.

Length: 524 meters.

Opened: 1899.

Contains: A theme park, shopping arcades and amusement arcades.

Visitors per year: 4 million.

Cost: Free.

MORE: 5 English seaside towns worth visiting even in winter

Busselton Jetty (Busselton, Australia)

This is the longest pier in the Southern Hemisphere.

A railway runs along its length and it’s the only pier with an underwater observatory at the end.

Prior to the Commonwealth Games in 2006, the Queen’s baton — the Commonwealth equivalent of the Olympic torch — was taken to the observatory and carried underwater by a diver.

Length: 1,841 meters.

Opened: 1865.

Contains: An observatory.

Cost: Free.

MORE: How to survive in the wilds of Australia

Tamara Hinson is a freelance travel writer based in the UK.

Article source: http://rss.cnn.com/~r/rss/edition_world/~3/JwqDZ-RDDxg/index.html

Family’s one last photo aboard MH17

Posted by MereNews On July - 28 - 2014 ADD COMMENTS

Dave Hally took one last photo of his wife and 4-year-old daughter before takeoff for their dream vacation aboard MH17. Erin Mclaughlin reports.

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Donetsk, Ukraine (CNN) — Dutch and Australian experts trying to reach the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 in war-torn eastern Ukraine turned back for the second day Monday after hearing explosions and being told of heavy fighting in the area.

The group — including officials from the Netherlands, Australia and the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe — returned to Donetsk, according to the Dutch-led investigation team.

The decision to turn back came a few hours before pro-Russian rebels said Ukraine’s military had broken through to part of the crash site and had stationed armored personnel carriers and dug trenches there.

“Safe work of experts and observers is impossible,” Vladimir Antyufeev, the acting Prime Minister for the self-proclaimed Donetsk People’s Republic, said Monday.

Neither Ukraine’s military nor the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe had confirmed the report.


Ukrainian civilians caught in crossfire


Fighting turns back MH17 investigators


Ukraine residents flee fighting

A birthday card found in a sunflower field near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 in eastern Ukraine, on Thursday, July 24. The passenger plane was shot down July 17 above Ukraine. All 298 people aboard were killed, and much of what they left behind was scattered in a vast field of debris.A birthday card found in a sunflower field near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 in eastern Ukraine, on Thursday, July 24. The passenger plane was shot down July 17 above Ukraine. All 298 people aboard were killed, and much of what they left behind was scattered in a vast field of debris.

A classical music record is seen among the sunflowers on July 24. A classical music record is seen among the sunflowers on July 24.

A shoe, appearing to be brand new, sits under foliage at the crash site. A shoe, appearing to be brand new, sits under foliage at the crash site.

Two Dutch passports belonging to passengers lie in a field at the site of the crash on Tuesday, July 22.Two Dutch passports belonging to passengers lie in a field at the site of the crash on Tuesday, July 22.

Clothing, sunglasses and chocolate are seen on July 22.Clothing, sunglasses and chocolate are seen on July 22.

More sunglasses and a travel guide lie in the field on July 22.More sunglasses and a travel guide lie in the field on July 22.

A doll is seen on the ground on Saturday, July 19.A doll is seen on the ground on Saturday, July 19.

A single shoe is seen among the debris and wreckage on July 19. There has been concern that the site has not been sealed off properly and that vital evidence is being tampered with. A single shoe is seen among the debris and wreckage on July 19. There has been concern that the site has not been sealed off properly and that vital evidence is being tampered with.

Pieces of a wristwatch lie on a plastic cover at the crash site. Pieces of a wristwatch lie on a plastic cover at the crash site.

A toy monkey.A toy monkey.

Books, bags, a tourist T-shirt. Ukraine's government said it had received reports of looting, and it urged relatives to cancel the victims' credit cards. But a CNN crew at the scene July 19 said it did not see any signs of looting.Books, bags, a tourist T-shirt. Ukraine’s government said it had received reports of looting, and it urged relatives to cancel the victims’ credit cards. But a CNN crew at the scene July 19 said it did not see any signs of looting.

Passports were scattered across the large field.Passports were scattered across the large field.

Playing cards and euros are seen at the crash site.Playing cards and euros are seen at the crash site.

A travel guide and toiletries.A travel guide and toiletries.

Luggage on Friday, July 18.Luggage on Friday, July 18.

An empty suitcase is cordoned off near the plane's impact site on Thursday, July 17.An empty suitcase is cordoned off near the plane’s impact site on Thursday, July 17.


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MH17: What they left behindMH17: What they left behind

The United Nations and other countries have repeatedly called for a cease-fire to allow investigators a safe working environment at the crash site, which the U.N. human rights chief said Monday could be the scene of a war crime.

Among other things, the Dutch and Australian team had hoped to work on the retrieval of human remains from the fields strewn with wreckage from the passenger jet, which had 298 people on board when a suspected surface-to-air missile brought it down July 17.

The Malaysian government had struck a deal with rebels to allow unarmed international police officers to guard the site, but the fighting has made that impossible.

“This is a contested zone. There is active fighting going on,” Andrew Colvin, deputy commissioner of the Australian Federal Police, said at a news conference Monday in Canberra.

“We are working on the basis that if it’s a permissive environment, we will go in,” he said.

Of the 298 people killed in the crash, 193 were Dutch, 43 were Malaysian and 27 were Australian.

As of Monday, 227 coffins bearing remains from the crashed plane had been sent to the Netherlands, where forensic investigators were working to identify them.

Russian role in conflict debated

The fighting appeared to be moving southeast from Horlivka, a city about 30 miles (about 50 kilometers) northwest of the crash site. At least 13 people, including two children, were killed in fighting Sunday in and near Horlivka, the Donetsk Regional Authority said.

At least 332 Ukrainian soldiers have been killed and nearly 1,300 have been injured since April 7, according to Ukraine’s National Defense and Security Council and law enforcement agencies. There is no known figure for the number of rebels killed.

Meanwhile, debate continued over Russia’s role in the conflict.

On Sunday, the State Department released satellite images that it said showed Russians firing into Ukraine.

“We are putting out evidence to confirm the points that not only has Russia been providing the weapons across the border, including heavy weapons, but they have also now been firing artillery barrages across the border,” senior White House adviser Ben Rhodes said in an interview with CNN.


Challenge of identifying MH17 victims


U.S.: Russia boosting forces in Ukraine


Family’s one last photo aboard MH17


U.S.: Russia ‘absolutely’ culpable for MH17

Russian officials have denied arming the rebels. At a news conference Monday, Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov said he hoped that deployment of an Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe observer mission at two checkpoints on the Russian-Ukrainian border would clarify what was happening on the ground.

Russia wants ‘impartial’ MH17 probe

U.S. and Ukrainian officials have said a Russian-made missile system was used to shoot down Flight 17 from rebel territory. Russia and the rebels have disputed the allegations and blamed Ukraine for the crash.

On Monday, U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights Navi Pillay said investigators need rapid access to the crash site.

“This violation of international law, given the prevailing circumstances, may amount to a war crime. It is imperative that a prompt, thorough, effective, independent and impartial investigation be conducted into this event,” Pillay said.

Russia announced over the weekend it had formed a team to join the investigation, state-run news agency RIA Novosti reported. It will be led by the deputy head of the Federal Air Transport Agency, Oleg Storchevoy.

Lavrov called for an “impartial” investigation carried out with agreement from the U.N. Security Council. But State Department spokeswoman Jen Psaki said Monday on CNN that the United States has little faith in what Russia says.

“The Russians have mastered the art of saying one thing and doing another,” she said.

Russian foreign minister shrugs off sanctions

Russian banks, energy companies and arms manufacturers have already been included in U.S. sanctions. Europe, which imports nearly 30% of its energy from Russia, has imposed limited sanctions of its own. On Friday, the European Union said it was strengthening those sanctions despite concerns about potential consequences.

The new propoals include sanctions on weapons, goods that can be used for both civilian and military purposes, access to European capital markets and on the export of energy technology from Europe to Russia.

Representatives from EU member states will meet Tuesday to consider the proposals, according to the EU website.

The State Department’s Psaki said Monday what happens next is up to Russia.

“We’re seeing a serious impact of just the sanctions we have put in place to date,” she said.

“The Europeans want to do more. We expect they’ll do more,” Psaki said. “So the question for the Russians is, do they care about the economy and how it’s impacting their people, or are they just going to be in denial about what impact these sanctions are having?”

Lavrov said Monday that the Russian government wasn’t happy about all the sanctions, but that the country would overcome any economic difficulties and become more independent as a result.

“We are only seeing the desire of our Western partners to punish Russia,” he said.

Read: What you need to know about Russia and sanctions

Read: Malaysian PM’s ‘quiet diplomacy’

Read: Who are Ukraine’s pro-Russia rebels

CNN’s Nick Paton Walsh reported from Donetsk, Kyung Lah reported from Kiev, Ukraine, and Jethro Mullen reported and wrote from Hong Kong. CNN’s Ivan Watson, Susannah Palk, Mick Krever, Ashley Fantz, Ray Sanchez, Radina Gigova, Deborah Bloom and Victoria Butenko contributed to this report.


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Militants in Syria put victims’ heads on poles

Posted by MereNews On July - 28 - 2014 ADD COMMENTS


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People carry an injured man away from the site of an airstrike, reportedly carried out by Syrian government forces, in Aleppo, Syria, on Sunday, July 27. The United Nations estimates more than 100,000 people have been killed in Syria since an uprising in March 2011 spiraled into civil war.People carry an injured man away from the site of an airstrike, reportedly carried out by Syrian government forces, in Aleppo, Syria, on Sunday, July 27. The United Nations estimates more than 100,000 people have been killed in Syria since an uprising in March 2011 spiraled into civil war.

A rebel fighter stands on a dust-covered street in Aleppo on Monday, July 21.A rebel fighter stands on a dust-covered street in Aleppo on Monday, July 21.

A man clears debris at the site of an alleged barrel-bomb attack in Aleppo on Tuesday, July 15.A man clears debris at the site of an alleged barrel-bomb attack in Aleppo on Tuesday, July 15.

A woman walks amid debris after an airstrike by government forces July 15 in Aleppo.A woman walks amid debris after an airstrike by government forces July 15 in Aleppo.

People walk on a dust-filled street after a reported barrel-bomb attack in Aleppo on Monday, July 7.People walk on a dust-filled street after a reported barrel-bomb attack in Aleppo on Monday, July 7.

Apartments and other buildings lie in ruins on Tuesday, June 3, in a href='http://www.cnn.com/2014/06/09/world/meast/syria-aleppo-reporters-notebook/'Aleppo, a city that has had the life bombed out of it,/a according to CNN's Nick Paton Walsh.Apartments and other buildings lie in ruins on Tuesday, June 3, in Aleppo, a city that “has had the life bombed out of it,” according to CNN’s Nick Paton Walsh.

A man carries a girl injured in a reported barrel-bomb attack by government forces June 3 in Aleppo.A man carries a girl injured in a reported barrel-bomb attack by government forces June 3 in Aleppo.

A rebel fighter loads an anti-tank cannon outside Latakia, Syria, on Sunday, June 1.A rebel fighter loads an anti-tank cannon outside Latakia, Syria, on Sunday, June 1.

A rescue worker pulls a girl from rubble in Aleppo on June 1 after reported bombing by government forces.A rescue worker pulls a girl from rubble in Aleppo on June 1 after reported bombing by government forces.

A giant poster of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad is seen in Damascus, Syria, on Saturday, May 31, as the capital prepares for presidential elections.A giant poster of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad is seen in Damascus, Syria, on Saturday, May 31, as the capital prepares for presidential elections.

Portraits of al-Assad dominate the cityscape in central Damascus on Tuesday, May 27. Al-Assad is firmly in power three years into the civil war, while the opposition remains weak and fragmented and extremists grow in numbers and influence.Portraits of al-Assad dominate the cityscape in central Damascus on Tuesday, May 27. Al-Assad is firmly in power three years into the civil war, while the opposition remains weak and fragmented and extremists grow in numbers and influence.

The father of a 3-month-old girl weeps Monday, May 26, after she was pulled from rubble following a barrel-bomb strike in Aleppo.The father of a 3-month-old girl weeps Monday, May 26, after she was pulled from rubble following a barrel-bomb strike in Aleppo.

A woman stands in a heavily damaged building in Aleppo on May 26.A woman stands in a heavily damaged building in Aleppo on May 26.

An injured man lies in a hospital bed after alleged airstrikes by government forces in Aleppo on Sunday, May 18.An injured man lies in a hospital bed after alleged airstrikes by government forces in Aleppo on Sunday, May 18.

Buildings in Homs, Syria, lie in ruins Saturday, May 10, days after an evacuation truce went into effect. Thousands of displaced residents returned to the city.Buildings in Homs, Syria, lie in ruins Saturday, May 10, days after an evacuation truce went into effect. Thousands of displaced residents returned to the city.

Rescuers carry a man wounded by a mine in the Bustan al-Diwan neighborhood of Homs on May 10.Rescuers carry a man wounded by a mine in the Bustan al-Diwan neighborhood of Homs on May 10.

A Syrian woman carries a suitcase along a street in the Juret al-Shayah district of Homs on May 10.A Syrian woman carries a suitcase along a street in the Juret al-Shayah district of Homs on May 10.

Residents carry their belongings in the al-Hamidieh neighborhood of Homs on May 10.Residents carry their belongings in the al-Hamidieh neighborhood of Homs on May 10.

A woman injured when a mine went off is carried in Homs on May 10.A woman injured when a mine went off is carried in Homs on May 10.

Residents return to damaged dwellings in Homs on May 10. Residents return to damaged dwellings in Homs on May 10.

Debris lies on a deserted street in Homs on Thursday, May 8. Debris lies on a deserted street in Homs on Thursday, May 8.

A mosque is seen through shattered glass in Homs, where an evacuation truce went into effect on Wednesday, May 7. A mosque is seen through shattered glass in Homs, where an evacuation truce went into effect on Wednesday, May 7.

A wounded man is treated at a makeshift hospital in Aleppo on Sunday, May 4.A wounded man is treated at a makeshift hospital in Aleppo on Sunday, May 4.

Debris rises in what Free Syrian Army fighters said was an operation to strike a checkpoint and remove government forces in Maarat al-Numan, Syria, on Monday, May 5.Debris rises in what Free Syrian Army fighters said was an operation to strike a checkpoint and remove government forces in Maarat al-Numan, Syria, on Monday, May 5.

A man helps a woman through debris after reported airstrikes by government forces on Thursday, May 1, in the Halak neighborhood of Aleppo. A man helps a woman through debris after reported airstrikes by government forces on Thursday, May 1, in the Halak neighborhood of Aleppo.

Syrians gather at the site of reported airstrikes in Aleppo on May 1. According to the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights, at least 33 civilians were killed in the attack.Syrians gather at the site of reported airstrikes in Aleppo on May 1. According to the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights, at least 33 civilians were killed in the attack.

A woman runs after two barrel bombs were thrown, reportedly by forces loyal to Syrian President Bashar al-Assad in Aleppo on May 1.A woman runs after two barrel bombs were thrown, reportedly by forces loyal to Syrian President Bashar al-Assad in Aleppo on May 1.

A boy runs in Aleppo on Sunday, April 27, after what activists said were explosive barrels thrown by forces loyal to al-Assad.A boy runs in Aleppo on Sunday, April 27, after what activists said were explosive barrels thrown by forces loyal to al-Assad.

Security and emergency medical personnel work at the site of a car bomb explosion Monday, April 14, in the Ekremah neighborhood of Homs. Security and emergency medical personnel work at the site of a car bomb explosion Monday, April 14, in the Ekremah neighborhood of Homs.

In this photo released by the state-run SANA news agency, Syrian forces take positions during clashes with rebels near the town of Rankous, Syria, on Sunday, April 13.In this photo released by the state-run SANA news agency, Syrian forces take positions during clashes with rebels near the town of Rankous, Syria, on Sunday, April 13.

Flames engulf a vehicle following a car bomb Wednesday, April 9, in the Karm al-Loz neighborhood of Homs.Flames engulf a vehicle following a car bomb Wednesday, April 9, in the Karm al-Loz neighborhood of Homs.

A man carries a child who was found in the rubble of an Aleppo building after it was reportedly bombed by government forces on Monday, March 18.A man carries a child who was found in the rubble of an Aleppo building after it was reportedly bombed by government forces on Monday, March 18.

An elderly man and a child walk among debris in a residential block of Aleppo on March 18. An elderly man and a child walk among debris in a residential block of Aleppo on March 18.

A woman with blood on her face carries a child following a reported airstrike by government forces Saturday, March 15, in Aleppo.A woman with blood on her face carries a child following a reported airstrike by government forces Saturday, March 15, in Aleppo.

People attempt to comfort a man in Aleppo after a reported airstrike by government forces on Sunday, March 9. People attempt to comfort a man in Aleppo after a reported airstrike by government forces on Sunday, March 9.

Buildings in Homs lay in ruins on March 9.Buildings in Homs lay in ruins on March 9.

Syrian forces fire a cannon and a heavy machine gun loaded on a truck as they fight rebels in the Syrian town of Zara on Saturday, March 8. Syrian forces fire a cannon and a heavy machine gun loaded on a truck as they fight rebels in the Syrian town of Zara on Saturday, March 8.

A handout photo released by SANA shows Syrian President Bashar al-Assad speaking March 8 during a meeting in Damascus to mark the 51st anniversary of the 1963 revolution, when Baath Party supporters in the Syrian army seized power. Al-Assad said the country will go on with reconciliation efforts along with its fight against terrorism.A handout photo released by SANA shows Syrian President Bashar al-Assad speaking March 8 during a meeting in Damascus to mark the 51st anniversary of the 1963 revolution, when Baath Party supporters in the Syrian army seized power. Al-Assad said the country will go on with reconciliation efforts along with its fight against terrorism.

Syrians inspect the rubble of destroyed buildings in Aleppo following a reported airstrike by Syrian government forces on Friday, March 7.Syrians inspect the rubble of destroyed buildings in Aleppo following a reported airstrike by Syrian government forces on Friday, March 7.

People dig through the rubble of a building in Damascus that was allegedly hit by government airstrikes on Thursday, February 27. People dig through the rubble of a building in Damascus that was allegedly hit by government airstrikes on Thursday, February 27.

A boy walks ahead of men carrying the body of his mother in Aleppo on Saturday, February 22. According to activists, the woman was killed when explosive barrels were thrown by forces loyal to al-Assad.A boy walks ahead of men carrying the body of his mother in Aleppo on Saturday, February 22. According to activists, the woman was killed when explosive barrels were thrown by forces loyal to al-Assad.

A man holds a baby who survived what activists say was an airstrike by al-Assad loyalists Friday, February 14, in Aleppo.A man holds a baby who survived what activists say was an airstrike by al-Assad loyalists Friday, February 14, in Aleppo.

In this photo provided by the anti-government activist group Aleppo Media Center, Syrian men help survivors out of a building in Aleppo after it was bombed, allegedly by a Syrian regime warplane on Saturday, February 8.In this photo provided by the anti-government activist group Aleppo Media Center, Syrian men help survivors out of a building in Aleppo after it was bombed, allegedly by a Syrian regime warplane on Saturday, February 8.

Syrians gather at a site hit by barrel bombs, allegedly dropped by a regime helicopter on the opposition-controlled Mesekin Hananu district of Aleppo on February 8.Syrians gather at a site hit by barrel bombs, allegedly dropped by a regime helicopter on the opposition-controlled Mesekin Hananu district of Aleppo on February 8.

In this handout photo released by the state-run SANA news agency on February 8, civilians wave national flags in Damascus as they take part in a rally in support of President al-Assad.In this handout photo released by the state-run SANA news agency on February 8, civilians wave national flags in Damascus as they take part in a rally in support of President al-Assad.

A man stands next to debris in the road following a reported airstrike by Syrian government forces in Aleppo on February 8.A man stands next to debris in the road following a reported airstrike by Syrian government forces in Aleppo on February 8.

Medical personnel look for survivors after a reported airstrike in Aleppo on Saturday, February 1.Medical personnel look for survivors after a reported airstrike in Aleppo on Saturday, February 1.

Syrians carry a dead body following an airstrike on February 1.Syrians carry a dead body following an airstrike on February 1.

A man walks amid debris and dust on January 31.A man walks amid debris and dust on January 31.

An injured man is covered in dust after an airstrike on January 29.An injured man is covered in dust after an airstrike on January 29.

A man tries to fix electrical wires in Aleppo on January 27.A man tries to fix electrical wires in Aleppo on January 27.

Rebels and civilians check out a crater that activists say resulted from a Syrian government airstrike on an Aleppo bus station on Tuesday, January 21.Rebels and civilians check out a crater that activists say resulted from a Syrian government airstrike on an Aleppo bus station on Tuesday, January 21.

Men rush to a site that Syrian government forces reportedly hit in Aleppo on January 21.Men rush to a site that Syrian government forces reportedly hit in Aleppo on January 21.

Buildings lie in ruins in Aleppo on Sunday, January 19, after reported air raids by Syrian government planes.Buildings lie in ruins in Aleppo on Sunday, January 19, after reported air raids by Syrian government planes.

A child collects items from a garbage pile in Douma, Syria, northeast of the capital, on Saturday, January 18.A child collects items from a garbage pile in Douma, Syria, northeast of the capital, on Saturday, January 18.

A piece of exploded mortar lies in a street in Daraya, a Syrian city southwest of Damascus, on Friday, January 17.A piece of exploded mortar lies in a street in Daraya, a Syrian city southwest of Damascus, on Friday, January 17.


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(CNN) — In some of the most gruesome images yet to emerge from the latest mass violence in Syria, videos show militants raising their victims’ severed heads on poles.

The amateur videos emerged as a Syrian human rights group reported 1,600 deaths in just 10 days this month.

The latest images come from an area taken over by the militant terrorist group the Islamic State, which recently changed its name from the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria, or ISIS. The group is known for killing dozens of people at a time and beheading some.

At least three videos posted on YouTube by different people show the grisly scene at a roundabout in the city of Reqqa, where Islamic State militants have been carrying out public executions, crucifixions and other acts decided by its Sharia, or Islamic law, court.

A narrator in one of the videos says the bodies are of Syrian soldiers who were killed by Islamic State fighters.

The videos surfaced online along with news that Islamic State took over the Syrian army’s 17th Division headquarters, which was considered the Syrian regime’s last remaining military base in Reqqa.

The Syrian Observatory for Human Rights, which has tabulated casualties in the country’s civil war, reported on Islamic State’s seizure of the military base in late May.

While fighting between Israel and Hamas militants in Gaza has gotten far more attention in recent days, the death toll in Syria has been higher.

Between July 16 and July 25, 1,600 people were killed, the observatory said.

And the bloodshed has continued at that pace. On Sunday, 180 people were killed, the group said.

The observatory counts more than 115,000 people killed since the beginning of the uprising against Syrian President Bashar al-Assad’s regime in March 2011.


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Pilot, air traffic control’s heated spat

Posted by MereNews On July - 28 - 2014 ADD COMMENTS

Hear the testy exchange between a Delta pilot and an air traffic controller. CNN’s Michaela Pereira has more.

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Girl accused of decapitation

Posted by MereNews On July - 28 - 2014 ADD COMMENTS

(CNN) — A 16-year-old Japanese girl has been arrested in Sasebo, Nagasaki prefecture, on suspicion of murdering a fellow student. Police confirmed that the alleged attacker also dismembered her victim’s body.

The girl, who cannot be named as she is a minor, is suspected of hitting Aiwa Matsuo, 15, with an object repeatedly before strangling her.

The victim’s family said that she had gone to meet friends Saturday afternoon and alerted police when she did not return later that evening.

The teen admitted killing Matsuo, and told police she acted alone. The teen, who turned 16 the day of her arrest, admitted to dismembering the body, including decapitation and severing her left hand.

The English-language Japan Times reported that the alleged attacker’s “friends and acquaintances” described her as “very smart, with emotional ups and downs.”

It has been reported that her father remarried after the suspect’s mother died last year and lives elsewhere in the southwestern Japanese city.

At a press conference, the principal of the school that both attacker and victim attended said that the institution was not aware of any trouble between the two.

“I have no words to say now. I am overwhelmed by sadness, regret and various feelings,” he said.

Reports indicate that the body was discovered early Sunday morning on a bed at the girl’s apartment, where she lives alone. Implements used in the attack were found on, and next to, the bed.

Despite Japan’s deserved reputation for safety and a relative lack of violent crime in the country, it is not the first time that Sasebo has appeared in headlines featuring violence perpetrated by minors — in 2004, an elementary school-aged girl in the city killed a classmate, slashing her throat.

Connecticut teen accused in slashing death of classmate charged as adult

12-year-old girl stabbed 19 times; friends arrested


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